FLORA

 

This one is Eriogonum fasciculatum var. foliolosum (CA buckwheat). This is the common buckwheat that is seen frequently in chaparral and coastal sage scrub areas. The flowers start out white, then turn pink, and then in the summer to fall turn a beautiful terra cotta color. This is one of the primary butterfly and bee habitat plants! Theodore did plant this species in Hollywoodland (based on the documents you gave me) – as to whether he started it from seed or plants I am not sure. It’s very possible that he sowed seed! It’s a knee-height perennial subshrub. Photo courtesy of Genny Arnold, Theodore Payne Foundation
Eriogonum fasciculatum var. foliolosum (CA buckwheat). This is the common buckwheat that is seen frequently in chaparral and coastal sage scrub areas. The flowers start out white, then turn pink, and then in the summer to fall turn a beautiful terra cotta color. This is one of the primary butterfly and bee habitat plants!
Theodore did plant this species in Hollywoodland (based on the documents you gave me) – as to whether he started it from seed or plants I am not sure. It’s very possible that he sowed seed!
It’s a knee-height perennial subshrub.
Photo courtesy of Genny Arnold, Theodore Payne Foundation
This is a Mirabilis, or 4 o’clock species. It could be the local native one (Mirabilis californica) or it could be an exotic – hard to tell from the photo. Theodore probably didn’t sow these; they are scattered (not as common as buckwheat, but still frequently occurring) throughout the Santa Monica Mountains. Photo courtesy of Genny Arnold, The Theodore Payne Foundation
Mirabilis, or 4 o’clock species. It could be the local native one (Mirabilis californica) or it could be an exotic – hard to tell from the photo. Theodore probably didn’t sow these; they are scattered (not as common as buckwheat, but still frequently occurring) throughout the Santa Monica Mountains. Photo courtesy of Genny Arnold, The Theodore Payne Foundation
This is definitely something in the genus Camissoniopsis, a common native all over the Los Angeles area. I think it is be Camissoniopsis bistorta, but don’t take me to the bank on the species for that one until I can key it out. But it is most definitely Camissoniopsis, and most likely not sown by Theodore Payne. It’s very common and occurs frequently in the wild. Photo courtesy of Genny Arnold, The Theodore Payne Foundation
Camissoniopsis, a common native all over the Los Angeles area. I think it is be Camissoniopsis bistorta, but don’t take me to the bank on the species for that one until I can key it out. But it is most definitely Camissoniopsis, and most likely not sown by Theodore Payne.
It’s very common and occurs frequently in the wild. Photo courtesy of Genny Arnold, The Theodore Payne Foundation